Why Is We Americans?

January 16, 2022

Three important books on race in America

January 10, 2022

Let’s consider a trio of books that can be helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of racism, both its practice and its ideological components, including in the current period.

Most current of the three is The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story (2021), created by Nikole Hannah-JonesIt consists of nineteen essays by eighteen different authors. The date signifies when the first enslaved Africans were delivered to Jamestown, Virginia. Most of the essays originally appeared in the New York Times in 2019 to mark 400 years of enslavement and its aftermath.

Click below to read the entire article:

https://peoplesworld.org/article/three-important-books-on-race-in-america-for-deep-winter-reading/


Richard Wright Novel Brought Back to Life

December 12, 2021


When​ Richard Wright sailed to France in 1946, he was 38 years old and already a legend. He was America’s most famous black writer, the author of two books hailed as classics the moment they were published: the 1940 novel Native Son and the 1945 memoir Black Boy. By ‘choosing exile’, as he put it, he hoped both to free himself from American racism and to put an ocean between himself and the Communist Party of the United States, in which he’d first come to prominence as a writer of proletarian fiction only to find himself accused of subversive, Trotskyist tendencies. In Paris he was a celebrity. French writers and American expatriates flocked to the Café Monaco, where he held court a short walk from his Left Bank flat. ‘Dick greeted everyone with boisterous condescension,’ Chester Himes remembered. ‘It was obvious he was the king thereabouts.’

Click below to read the entire article:

https://www.lrb.co.uk/the-paper/v43/n19/adam-shatz/outcasts-and-desperados


Sonia Sanchez – Collected Poems

December 12, 2021

A wonderful reading and conversation with the great poet Sonia Sanchez.

Collected Poems was published this year and is essential reading.


Music Video of the Week

April 10, 2021

Peter Gabriel – Biko


How Armed Black Southerners Helped Fight for Civil Rights

June 6, 2014

An important side of the civil rights movement that must be learned and discussed. It’s a history that’s been ignored for far too long.

Most history students never learn that even Martin Luther King Jr.—arguably history’s greatest spokesperson on behalf of nonviolence—had armed guards stationed outside of his home and a pistol tucked in his sofa in 1955 when he emerged as the leader of the bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala.

But he did.

As time went on, he came to trust in the philosophy of nonviolence in his personal life as much as he believed in its power politically, and eventually got rid of both the guards and guns. At some point, though, we glossed over this complexity and began to think of nonviolence as preordained and as a natural outgrowth of the movement.

We don’t teach our children about the training civil rights activists had to endure in order to prepare their minds and bodies for nonviolent protests. And we don’t often think about how the movement functioned in rural places, far from the glare of the spotlights of network news cameras. Outside of the national gaze, what might check the violence of white segregationists who resisted every attempt by black citizens to assert their right to vote and to organize politically? How did the movement work in the face of the violence in rural Union County, N.C.; Lowndes County, Ala.; or Sunflower County, Miss.?

That’s the story masterfully told by Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee field secretary and now journalist Charles Cobb in his challenging and important new narrative, This Nonviolent Stuff’ll Get You Killed: How Guns Made the Civil Rights Movement Possible, which adds to a growing list of important histories that expand what we know about the way organizing had to work in rural communities.

Click here to read the entire article


Love Liberates

May 29, 2014

Dr. Maya Angelou


Santana and Friends Team to Save Coltrane Home

September 21, 2013

Santana and Friends Team to Save Coltrane Home
Benefit planned to open residence where “A Love Supreme” was written to the public

By Emily Hutton

The Coltrane Home in Dix Hills, N.Y., where the late saxophonist John Coltrane lived from 1964-67, Long Island has long been deemed historic. The Long Island home is not only where Coltrane and his wife, Alice, raised their children, but it is also where Coltrane composed A Love Supreme. Now, according a press release, the National Trust for Historic Preservation has named the Coltrane residence “one of the most endangered historic places in the country,” and Carlos Santana and friends are stepping in to help.

Click here to read entire article


The Trials of Muhammad Ali

August 21, 2013


Medgar Evers Legacy Lives On

June 6, 2013

Paying Tribute to a Seeker of Justice, 50 Years After His Assassination
By ASHLEY SOUTHALL

ARLINGTON, Va. — Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of the slain civil rights leader Medgar Evers, said her husband was a man who saw a job that needed to be done, and he answered the call, “not just for his people but for all people.”

Ms. Evers-Williams and a group of about 300 visitors, including Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. and former President Bill Clinton, observed the 50th anniversary of Mr. Evers’s assassination on Wednesday at Arlington National Cemetery, where Mr. Evers is buried.


Click here for entire article