Messi Documentary

July 3, 2014


Why did Borges hate soccer?

June 20, 2014

Some of Borges’ critiques are valid and relevant today. The nationalism generated by football does result in the fanaticism, hatred, racism, and xenophobia displayed by fans all over the world. Also, how the game is used by politicians and dictators for their own self-interest and to support their political objectives.

These are all undeniable realities that are still an ugly part of football.

But even a genius like Borges can be wrong.

The flow and artistry of the game is beautiful and timeless. It is not mind boggling that Borges was not able to understand and recognize the aesthetic wonder that is football.

His own prejudices brought out the blinders.

Soccer is popular,” Jorge Luis Borges observed, “because stupidity is popular.”

At first glance, the Argentine writer’s animus toward “the beautiful game” seems to reflect the attitude of today’s typical soccer hater, whose lazy gibes have almost become a refrain by now: Soccer is boring. There are too many tie scores. I can’t stand the fake injuries.

And it’s true: Borges did call soccer “aesthetically ugly.”

He did say, “Soccer is one of England’s biggest crimes.”

Click here for the entire article


Martino & the New Barcelona

August 4, 2013

Gerardo Martino is the new FC Barcelona manager.

Martino’s hiring did not occur in the best of circumstances as the previous manager, Tito Vilanova, had to step down due to his recurring illness.

It’s been interesting to observe the reaction to Martino’s hiring in Catalunya and all over Europe.

The Catalan media, in its majority, were not very excited about Martino.

Their overwhelming favorite to replace Vilanova was Luis Enrique even though Enrique’s managing experience is limited and despite the fact that Enrique is already under contract with another team in Spain for this upcoming season.

None of that mattered too much to the Catalan media because the difference maker to them was the many years that Enrique played with Barcelona. Having that Barca identity trumped just about everything else and all other manager candidates.

I certainly understand that sentiment but do not think it is the right point of view.

Luis Enrique’s experience as a Barca player is definitely a plus in the sense of him knowing the club, its fans, its history, its demands, and the club’s culture.

But that is not enough.

In football, good players don’t always make good managers and great players too don’t always make great managers. There are many examples. The flip side of that is average players or even worse have become good or even great managers. There are examples of that as well.

Gerardo Martino’s career as a manager has been an interesting one.

Martino started in Argentina, managing in Second Division and then several small clubs in First Division. He then moved on to Paraguay where he was Champion four times with two different teams. All that success brought him to the Paraguay national team where he led them through the very difficult South American World Cup Qualifiers and on to the 2010 World Cup in which Paraguay made it to the Quarterfinals and almost made it to the Semifinals if it wasn’t for losing a close game to Spain.

Martino also managed Paraguay in two Copa America’s, making it to the Final in 2011, and managed club teams from Paraguay and Argentina in the Copa Libertadores reaching the Semifinals twice.

Martino’s philosophy as manager has been consistent. He believes in attacking football with a foundation of short, accurate passing and constant play build up.

Before signing with Barca, Martino managed Newell’s Old Boys in Argentina and won the league title exhibiting a very attractive brand of football, the kind that Martino believes in. The kind that FC Barcelona also believes in.

I do not foresee any major changes to Barca with Martino as manager.

The team structure will remain mostly intact and its footballing philosophy will remain unchanged. Martino, though, will bring his considerable managing experience, his proven ability to handle locker rooms and players on a human level. Martino will surely add some of his own concepts to the team.

There have been alot of football observers in Europe questioning Martino’s signing as new Barca manager.

Most of the arguments have been along the lines that Martino never managed in Europe, a big disqualifier in their view.

As if a different game is played in Europe. As far as I know, in the old continent it is still eleven players against eleven players, the ball is still round, and every game lasts 90 minutes.

I’m not surprised by those arguments though as they are wrapped in euro-centric views and to a certain extent a South American bias.

That is nothing new.

So, how will things go for Martino and Barca as a new era begins in the Camp Nou?.

I am very optimistic and believe that there will be more success.

I believe that Martino is the right manager at the right time for Barcelona.

It will be very fascinating to watch as La Liga and the Champions League season’s unfold.

May the good times continue to roll in Catalunya.


Two New Books About Borges

August 3, 2013

Two New Books About “Borges”
Posted by Mark O’Connell

Few artists have built grand structures on such uncertain foundations as Jorge Luis Borges. Doubt was the sacred principle of his work, its animating force and, frequently, its message. To read his stories is to experience the dissolution of all certainty, all assumption about the reliability of your experience of the world. Of the major literary figures of the twentieth century, Borges seems to have been the least convinced by himself—by the imposing public illusion of his own fame. The thing Borges was most skeptical about was the idea of a writer, a man, named Borges.

In his memorable prose piece “Borges and I,” he addresses a deeply felt distinction between himself and “the other one, the one called Borges.” “I like hourglasses,” he writes, “maps, eighteenth-century typography, the taste of coffee, and the prose of Stevenson; he shares these preferences, but in a vain way that turns them into the attributes of an actor.” He recognizes almost nothing of himself in the eminent literary personage with whom he shares a name, a face, and certain other superficial qualities. “I do not know which of us has written this page,” he concludes.

Click here to read entire article


91 Goals

January 2, 2013

91 goals.

In one year.

The latest accomplishment in Lionel Messi’s career.

It is a staggering number.

It seems unreal but it isn’t because with Messi anything is possible on the football field.

Even at this stage of Lio’s career, all the praise, recognition, marvel, and other words used to describe his talent and greatness have been exhausted.

Is there really anything new or original that can be said about this extraordinary football player who continues to break records, make history and add new chapters to his Ongoing Legend?.

There are people that argue that Messi cannot be considered one of the best players in football history unless he wins a World Cup.

I disagree.

Messi has already earned that status and before his career is over he may very well be the greatest player in the history of the game.

I think it is shortsighted and wrong to attempt to define Messi’s career and legacy by whether he wins or does not win a World Cup.

Messi’s accomplishments in European football have blazed a great trail for him and have him on the great path that he is on as a football player.

It is making the argument that, in the end, winning a World Cup must be the defining moment/accomplishment for Messi and his place in football history more and more irrelevant.

Messi’s brilliance does not need to be established once every four years because it is there for all to see every week, all the time.

91 goals in one year.

Will anyone ever get near or even break that record?

As the saying goes, all records are meant to be broken but it may be a while before this one is surpassed.

Or maybe not.

Because with Messi anything is possible on the football field.


Music Video of the Week

July 15, 2011

Astor Piazzolla – Llueve sobre Santiago


Facundo Cabral

July 11, 2011

Gracias Maestro por su arte, por su voz, por su lucha y por su ejemplo.

Pobre los mediocres que trataron de callarlo.

No pudieron nunca.

Unos imbeciles le habran quitado la vida pero no su humanidad y espirito, porque se mantendran viva.

Gracias por ser un Gran Hombre y una inspiracion eterna.